Questions on Zazen and TM

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  • Ankai
    Treeleaf Unsui
    • Nov 2007
    • 914

    #31
    But, frankly, I think that Amida Buddha is a fiction much like the Angel Gabriel. I can appreciate him symbolically, but my Practice is not based on any such mythical creature (at least, I do not have need for that). It is centered on a (probably) historical Shakyamuni, who was a fellow like you and me, a human being of flesh and blood (although a pretty smart one).

    I see your point. If, however, Amida Buddha (and all the other Buddhas mentioned) are viewed as manifestations of different aspects of THE Buddha, and Buddha is percieved as something within ones' self (as opposed to the idea of an external "god" concept,) or, as the texts themselves put it, "projections of one's OWN mind," then couldn't one say that Amida Buddha is just as "real" as any of us?
    I'm not much into the "hocus pocus" of a lot of rituals, and "theology" leaves me cold; but there are spiritual principles in the practices of other forms of Buddhism that I can appreciate and sort of run through a "Zen filter," if that makes sense.
    Gassho!
    護道 安海


    -Godo Ankai

    I'm still just starting to learn. I'm not a teacher. Please don't take anything I say too seriously. I already take myself too seriously!

    Comment

    • Jundo
      Treeleaf Founder and Priest
      • Apr 2006
      • 39485

      #32
      Hi,

      Oh, in that way, I sure DO believe in Amida Buddha, Kannon, the Angel Gabriel, and all the rest. The devil too, and the Boogie Man. The certainly do represent truths within all of us, and something about the human condition ... which cannot be separated from the truth of the universe at all. What is in us is the outside too. We had a nice chat about this once before on the forum, worth looking at. I wrote ...

      viewtopic.php?p=2869#2869

      Originally posted by Jundo

      Hi Will,

      I want to say again that I believe in Buddhist Heavens and Hells, Buddhas (apart from the historical Shakyamuni) and Boddhisattvas, and all the rest of the Buddhist cosmology, in much the spirit of that famous essay ... "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus". Did you ever read that? A little girle wrote to a newspaper editor, back in 1897, saying that she'd heard from friends that there is no Santa Claus. "Is it true?", she asked. Part of the response ran like this ...

      What? You don't believe in Santa Claus?

      Gassho and Ho Ho Ho, Jundo


      VIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except [what] they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men's or children's, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge.

      Yes, VIRGINIA, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no VIRGINIAS. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished.

      http://www.newseum.org/yesvirginia/
      ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

      Comment

      • paige
        Member
        • Apr 2007
        • 234

        #33
        Originally posted by Jundo
        I am in a difficult position, because (to use an analogy) I am a Karate teacher, and I cannot recommend that you mix your Karate training with Judo (both Karate and Judo have similarities, and both are beautiful practices, but ...
        Lol, actually when I was studying martial arts, my Aikido teacher was very supportive of my taking T'ai Chi classes (and vice-versa). 8) (Now I'm wondering how to relate the hard/soft martial arts to Jiriki/Tariki... lol)

        I think that there are good and bad points to practising in more than one tradition. I think it's too easy these days to slip into a spiritual dilettantism, especially when the practice is difficult and results aren't quick or obvious. On the other hand, if I hadn't been willing to change traditions a few times, I would have missed out on several excellent teachers and my life would be much the poorer.

        Comment

        • Jun
          Member
          • Jun 2007
          • 236

          #34
          Originally posted by Jundo

          I am in a difficult position, because (to use an analogy) I am a Karate teacher, and I cannot recommend that you mix your Karate training with Judo (both Karate and Judo have similarities, and both are beautiful practices, but ...
          Yet, the art of Doshin Sõ - known as Shorinji kempõ - is exactly that; a synthesis of karate and Judõ.

          Most of today's martial traditions owe their origins to a synthesis of styles. In the Edo jidai in particular, it was the combining of techniques and strategies from many lineages and styles that led to the large number of ryũ-ha.

          gassho
          Gassho
          Jun
          The life and teachings of Suzuki Shõsan Rõshi - http://kongoshin.blogspot.com/

          Comment

          • Jundo
            Treeleaf Founder and Priest
            • Apr 2006
            • 39485

            #35
            I teach what I teach.

            It may seem inflexible to some, but I feel it right for me to do so and to keep Treeleaf focused on Shikantaza.

            I am happy to discuss other traditions and any topic in the universe, but not to engage in any other Practice here.

            Sorry, but I am the fish monger and I don't sell turnips.

            Gassho, J

            PS - So that I don't come across as hypocritical after my stand on 'E-Sangha', that group is supposed to be a general discussion forum on all sects of Buddhism, open to all sects of Buddhism and (supposedly) not dedicated or giving precedence to any one school of Buddhism. In contrast, Treeleaf is a practice hall with a teacher devoted to a particular practice. That is the difference in my mind.
            ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

            Comment

            • Longdog
              Member
              • Nov 2007
              • 448

              #36
              Hey Jundo I don't think you are coming acoss as hypocritical in relation to e-sanga thread, you are just stating your case whilst allowing discussion.

              Forums are for discussion after all :lol:

              Kev
              [url:x8wstd0h]http://moder-dye.blogspot.com/[/url:x8wstd0h]

              Comment

              • Jun
                Member
                • Jun 2007
                • 236

                #37
                Originally posted by Jundo
                I teach what I teach.

                It may seem inflexible to some, but I feel it right for me to do so and to keep Treeleaf focused on Shikantaza.

                I am happy to discuss other traditions and any topic in the universe, but not to engage in any other Practice here.

                Sorry, but I am the fish monger and I don't sell turnips.

                Gassho, J

                PS - So that I don't come across as hypocritical after my stand on 'E-Sangha', that group is supposed to be a general discussion forum on all sects of Buddhism, open to all sects of Buddhism and (supposedly) not dedicated or giving precedence to any one school of Buddhism. In contrast, Treeleaf is a practice hall with a teacher devoted to a particular practice. That is the difference in my mind.
                Oh, I agree 100% with you Jundõ, it's your sandpit we are invited to play in, so you set the rules of play. I thought that the Budõ analogy wasn't a good one however. It is based on the misconception that methods of martial combat are beyond evolution and tinkering.

                And you aren't coming across as hypocritical at all.

                Gassho
                Gassho
                Jun
                The life and teachings of Suzuki Shõsan Rõshi - http://kongoshin.blogspot.com/

                Comment

                • paige
                  Member
                  • Apr 2007
                  • 234

                  #38
                  Seconding everything Jun said.

                  Comment

                  • Bansho
                    Member
                    • Apr 2007
                    • 532

                    #39
                    Hi Jundo,

                    Originally posted by Jundo
                    I teach what I teach.

                    It may seem inflexible to some, but I feel it right for me to do so and to keep Treeleaf focused on Shikantaza.
                    ...
                    In contrast, Treeleaf is a practice hall with a teacher devoted to a particular practice. That is the difference in my mind.
                    I can only speak for myself, but I am really glad that that is the case. The net is full of 'jackalopes' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackalope (Ger. 'Wolpertinger' http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolpertinger). I think that is why lots of them will never be more than just chat forums whereas Treeleaf is IMHO a real Sangha.

                    Gassho
                    Ken
                    ??

                    Comment

                    • paige
                      Member
                      • Apr 2007
                      • 234

                      #40
                      Originally posted by Kenneth
                      I can only speak for myself, but I am really glad that that is the case. The net is full of 'jackalopes'
                      To search for Bodhi apart from this world is like looking for a hare with horns. ~Platform Sutra

                      Comment

                      • Rev R
                        Member
                        • Jul 2007
                        • 457

                        #41
                        Originally posted by Jundo
                        I teach what I teach.
                        Agreed, not hypocritical or inflexible. Soto Zen sangha, Shikantaza is the meditation method of Soto, Jundo emphasizes Shikantaza. Why would it be any other way?

                        Things can get confusing very quickly when a blending of styles is introduced and we have a few "10th kyu" here. I think that may be where Jundo is coming from.

                        It's not to say that certain methods are inferior, but to keep things simple for those who are relatively new to Buddhist practice, "official" Treeleaf training needs to be focused solely in Soto and thereby in shikantaza. There is plenty of time to experiment individually after the basics have been mastered.

                        Just like in the jisei jukai discussion on another thread. Jundo our friend and brother was in agreement with the reasoning, but because he must also wear the sensei hat in this sangha endorsing alternate methods can only lead to confusion.

                        One cannot clearly examine a teaching if the teaching one is examining is not clear.

                        As the monk said to the lady when he put her down, "Lay off the pudding."

                        Comment

                        • Jundo
                          Treeleaf Founder and Priest
                          • Apr 2006
                          • 39485

                          #42
                          Originally posted by HezB
                          Jundo,

                          ...

                          Now, where do you stand on abortion...?

                          Regards,

                          Harry.
                          Harry,

                          I would like to leave my views on abortion out of this for now (I am sure we will have time to talk about abortion sometime in detail). It is such a complicated issue, no less so from a Buddhist perspective as from a Judeo-Christian.

                          However, I thought you might find this interesting: For cultural reasons not directly related to Buddhism, abortion is much more casually accepted in Japan as a means of birth control. But, there is some belief in the need to appease the spirit of the child, who is in a kind of limbo. So, a statue of Jizo is often purchased after an abortion (some temples contain whole sections filled with thousands upon thousands of these statues, including for children who died of illness, but mostly for the aborted)



                          The result is that a lot of Buddhist temples in Japan, indirectly, make a good living off of this. If you are very interested in the topic, here is an article ...

                          http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-EPT/joan.htm

                          and a good book on the subject ...

                          http://www.amazon.com/Liquid-Life-Willi ... 0691029652

                          Gassho, Jundo
                          ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

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