RECOMMENDED DAILY Metta PRACTICE

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  • Jundo
    Treeleaf Founder and Priest
    • Apr 2006
    • 39237

    #16
    Originally posted by StoBird

    May I deeply and honestly practice the four Bodhisattva vows and atonement with magnanimity, love, and joy

    May I be humble and kind today

    May I lend a hand today

    ...
    Those are really good affirmations, Tom!

    I am going to look at them more closely, and maybe we can even make something like this part of our recommended daily Liturgy practice. Lovely!

    RECOMMENDED 'At Home' Liturgy


    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

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    • Jundo
      Treeleaf Founder and Priest
      • Apr 2006
      • 39237

      #17
      Some interesting insights on Metta from a scholar's paper. First, on definition of the word itself:

      In the text Atthasālinī, Buddhaghosa explains the meaning of the word mettā using the example of the verb “mejjati” ... , which means “love” or “like.” He also defines friendship as mettā. Thus, mettā is a term that can have various meanings such as friendship, goodwill, fellowship, harmony, non-aggression, and non-violence. This is described in the Suttanipāta and the Khuddaka-pātha: “May all beings be happy and secure; may they be inwardly happy!”
      He contrasts Metta, loving-kindness, in Buddhism with Compassion (Karuna) in Buddhism:

      In the Theravāda commentaries, “loving-kindness” is explained in contrast to “compassion” (karunā):

      “In order to ‘make [sentient beings] happy’, the desire to bring [to one’s fellow man] that which is beneficial and good is loving-kindness.”

      “‘Oh! Indeed, may [sentient beings] be free from suffering’; therefore, the desire to remove strife and sorrow [from fellow humans’ lives] is compassion.”
      In the Mahayana, we might say that Compassion is the desire for others to have insight into Emptiness, and thus to be free of the basic existential suffering of "Dukkha," while Metta is more for their earthly and bodily health and happiness.

      Also, it is not wrong from one to wish Metta to oneself, but attitude matters:

      Here we can see clearly that loving-kindness is “neighborly love” or “true love for others.” However, the Buddha teaches that in order to love others, you must love yourself first. In other words, while the Buddha acknowledges instinctive self-love, he teaches that in order to truly benefit oneself, one must not harm other beings. ... This kind of love for a neighbor or true love for others actually begins with attakāma or atta-piya, which means “self-love.” Self-love is often confused with selfishness, individualism, and narcissism, but in fact, it is extremely natural and not bad at all. If a human being does not have a loving heart, he cannot survive the harsh natural environment or face the fierce competition for survival. Rather, self-love enables survival, reproduction, and human cultural development. Thus, biologically and socially, self-love is essential. However, if your love turns to selfishness that simply loves only the self and does not care for others, it becomes a problem.
      from: Self-Immolation in Early Indian Buddhism by KIM HAN-SANG
      https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/...eself%20ablaze.

      Gassho, J

      STLah
      ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

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      • WorkerB
        Member
        • Jan 2023
        • 177

        #18


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